A Ghostly Perspective

This next post was inspired by a film that I’ve recently watched titled, The Haunting in Connecticut 2: Ghosts of Georgia. The film is based on a true story and here is its description: “A historic Southern home’s new residents come face to face with a malevolent force.”

While watching, that was when it dawned on me that I was already familiar with the people portrayed in the film. I had seen them on other paranormal shows talking about their story and discussing the daughter’s ability of clairvoyance and communicating with the dead.

After I finished watching the film, it got me to thinking about ghosts and why some of them seem to be so malevolent. Perhaps their spirit isn’t actually malevolent at all. Maybe they just seem that way because they are trying to convey a message to the living. And after countless failed attempts of communication with the living, the ghosts become enraged because they have something to say but have no way of reaching the other side.

I know it may sound crazy, even far-fetched, but it made me think. So, by the time these ghosts finally find someone with whom they are able to communicate, they’re ready to unleash all their built-up emotions. And with the rush of feeling (and the fact that they’re dead) it’s easy to understand why the living can get so terrified by a paranormal encounter.

It makes total sense to me. Put yourself in their position. One day you’re walking down the street and all is well, then unfortunately something tragically out of the blue happens and you’re no longer part of the living. You’re now on the other side. You’re terrified, freaking out and you have no one to turn to. You try so hard to communicate with the living, but nothing – nadda. You try and try until one day your persistence finally becomes successful when you’re able to communicate with someone. But by this time, when you’re able to speak to a clairvoyant or whomever, you’ve got all this rush of excitement and that’s what scares the living because it becomes too overwhelming for them to handle.

Now this isn’t me in any way, shape or form, discarding all malevolent entities as non-malevolent. Extreme caution should always be utilized when investigating the paranormal because there are evil creatures/beings on the other side. So, be careful!

But the film did make me think and I wanted to share……

ghosts

Fear Cemeteries?

Fear cemeteries? Wait, no way… not me!!

Hmmm…. The fascination of cemeteries, graves, headstones, gargoyles…. etc. etc…. To many, they are quite attracted to such places. Why? Well, to me (and yes, I am one of those who find these macabre locations to be rather intriguing.) there’s something serene about the atmosphere. I am at such peace when I am at a cemetery. Which, if one truly thinks about it, should be comforting to know that the dead are “resting in peace”. After all, I am an empath and can feel the deceased’s energy. 😉

Did you know that there is actually a name for this curious allure? It’s referred to as coimetromania. According to an online definition, it’s simply defined as “An abnormal attraction to and desire to visit cemeteries.” There are many, many people with this interest. And I’m sure that with each individual, their reasoning is just as unique as they are……Find out more by reading….. A Grave Attraction

The Historical Saluda Hill Cemetery

Saluda Hill Cemetery is a private historical cemetery established in 1824. Among the graves here is that of Zachariah Godbold, the only known Revolutionary War veteran buried in Baldwin County. Many Blakeley residents and Confederate soldiers also are buried in the cemetery.
 
Erected 1997 by Alabama Historical Association.” ~ https://www.hmdb.org/m.asp?m=81854

The location is a small one with headstones dating back a couple of centuries. As mentioned above, Revolutionary War veteran Zachariah Godbold is buried there as well.  ~ https://sites.rootsweb.com/~alzgcdar/photos.htm

It’s a fascinating cemetery, aged, yet it also includes a few burials from recent years. My husband and I saw it across from the entrance of the Historic Blakeley State Park. Before heading back home, we decided to check it out and pay our respects to the graves.

Inside the cemetery were a couple of sectioned off places that looked like family plots. These two separate areas had low brick walls and wrought iron fences with a gate. One of the squared off plots had several old headstones dating back to the 1800s. One was of a young mother and her two young children. The headstone beside theirs was so weathered and worn that it was pieced together like a puzzle. It was obvious that someone went to great lengths to keep it together because it was being held up by some sort of makeshift metal brace.

The second sectioned off place didn’t have any visible markers or headstones that my husband or I could see. Perhaps it was due to the overgrowth of grass, or maybe the graves were unknown, or maybe the surviving family members couldn’t afford headstones (which was often the case back in the day.)

And at the back of this old cemetery was another gate with a pathway that lead to the Alabama State Veterans Memorial Cemetery. This cemetery was beautifully kept as well.

The following are some photos that we took of the historical Saluda Hill Cemetery.

This photo is of The Alabama State Veterans Memorial Cemetery.

A Grave Fear

It’s the safest place in the world to be.” So often I hear this when it comes to the reference of cemeteries. Why? People always tell me it’s because the dead are not a part of the living any longer and it’s impossible for them to inflict harm to anyone. Then why is there such terror in the hearts of the individuals who suffer from coimetrophobia? Hmm… good question!

Coimetrophobia is the fear of cemeteries. Those who live with this phobia say that when they are in or around cemeteries, they experience shortness of breath, bodily shakes and breaking out in a sweat, just to name a few. More severe cases even experience heart palpitations and a sense of temporary paralyzation, preventing the sufferer to move. In fact, some people are so terrified by cemeteries that they avoid them all together.

Now, this is not a fear that has manifested itself only in recent years. It actually has been around for quite some time. Fear of the dead rising due to superstitious lore has plagued mankind throughout the ages. It has given birth to such creatures like zombies, vampires and other similar beings. And thanks to Hollywood, such frightening legends have been given a form of life across the silver screen. I, myself enjoy a hair-raising tale. I believe it keeps the blood pumping and the senses intact.

I personally do not have a fear of cemeteries. However, one night when I was much younger and while out with some friends, we went to an old church and cemetery that were way out in the middle of the countryside on an old gravelly road. The night was solemn as the moonlight shined on the top of each grave. We all walked among the headstones in search of anything that had the potential to frighten a bunch of teen girls. Nothing out of the ordinary was seen that I can recall, except for a small red glow viewable through the church’s window. Keep in mind that this church was not hooked up to any electricity. It even had an outhouse located at the back of its property. So, how was it possible to see the red light inside an old structure with graves dated back from the late 1800s?

We never investigated it, nor did any research relating to the site. We decided to keep our distance and leave it alone. But to think of that night still ponders me to this day.

Phantom Travelers ~ a.k.a. ~ Ghostly Hitchhikers

There have been countless reports of these preternatural creatures throughout the centuries. Phantom travelers are supposedly the spirits of humans and/or animals that haunt certain locations like roads or well traveled areas. They’re thought to originate from the catastrophic events that happened at these locations, therefore intensifying tenacious emotional attachments that heighten the supernatural energy of these places. Such horrific events include car crashes, train wrecks and motorcycle accidents just to name a few that have proven fatal.

These spirits appear as if they are among the living, like you and me. They seem tangible without any transparency at all. Yet, they are not to be confused with doppelgangers for they are not harbingers of doom. The opaque apparitions seem deeply saddened, traumatized and severely lonely.

They are commonly seen alongside roads, railroad tracks and even cemeteries. Often, a passerby traveling will see these life-like phantoms as they suddenly appear in the car’s headlights. Looking as if they are distressed, the driver will ask the ghost if they are in need of any help or possibly wanting a ride somewhere. Several reports claim that when the living person’s kind offer was accepted, there was little interaction with their ghostly passenger. And once destination was reached, the phantom traveler exited the vehicle only to vanish into thin air, leaving the driver completely terrified and confused.

When I was growing up, an urban legend floated around town that mystified all those who listened. The details, for me, were never clear, but I somehow remember the tale of a headless woman that haunted a small bridge on a county road. It was said that anyone stopping on this old bridge around the hour of midnight, turning off their car and then repeatedly flashing the headlights, would see the vision of the headless woman carrying her head in front of the vehicle. Did I ever try this alleged paranormal experiment? Of course I did with many of my friends, but was unable to witness anything conclusive.

Perhaps the ghostly hitchhikers aren’t aware of their passing or are simply too distraught to move on, causing them to be trapped in our physical realm. Who knows…

A Grave Fear

“It’s the safest place in the world to be.” So often I hear this when it comes to the reference of cemeteries. Why? People always tell me it’s because the dead are not a part of the living any longer and it’s impossible for them to inflict harm to anyone. Then why is there such terror in the hearts of the individuals who suffer from coimetrophobia? Hmm… good question!

Coimetrophobia is the fear of cemeteries. Those who live with this phobia say that when they are in or around cemeteries, they experience shortness of breath, bodily shakes and breaking out in a sweat, just to name a few. More severe cases even experience heart palpitations and a sense of temporary paralyzation, preventing the sufferer to move. In fact, some people are so terrified by cemeteries that they avoid them all together.

Now, this is not a fear that has manifested itself only in recent years. It actually has been around for quite some time. Fear of the dead rising due to superstitious lore has plagued mankind throughout the ages. It has given birth to such creatures like zombies, vampires and other similar beings. And thanks to Hollywood, such frightening legends have been given a form of life across the silver screen. I, myself enjoy a hair-raising tale. I believe it keeps the blood pumping and the senses intact.

I personally do not have a fear of cemeteries. However, one night when I was much younger and while out with some friends, we went to an old church and cemetery that were way out in the middle of the countryside on an old gravelly road. The night was solemn as the moonlight shined on the top of each grave. We all walked among the headstones in search of anything that had the potential to frighten a bunch of teen girls. Nothing out of the ordinary was seen that I can recall, except for a small red glow viewable through the church’s window. Keep in mind that this church was not hooked up to any electricity. It even had an outhouse located at the back of its property. So, how was it possible to see the red light inside an old structure with graves dated back from the late 1800s?

We never investigated it, nor did any research relating to the site. We decided to keep our distance and leave it alone. But to think of that night still ponders me to this day.

A Ghostly Perspective

This next post was inspired by a film that I’ve recently watched titled, The Haunting in Connecticut 2: Ghosts of Georgia. The film is based on a true story and here is its description: “A historic Southern home’s new residents come face to face with a malevolent force.”

While watching, that was when it dawned on me that I was already familiar with the people portrayed in the film. I had seen them on other paranormal shows talking about their story and discussing the daughter’s ability of clairvoyance and communicating with the dead.

After I finished watching the film, it got me to thinking about ghosts and why some of them seem to be so malevolent. Perhaps their spirit isn’t actually malevolent at all. Maybe they just seem that way because they are trying to convey a message to the living. And after countless failed attempts of communication with the living, the ghosts become enraged because they have something to say but have no way of reaching the other side.

I know it may sound crazy, even far-fetched, but it made me think. So, by the time these ghosts finally find someone with whom they are able to communicate, they’re ready to unleash all their built-up emotions. And with the rush of feeling (and the fact that they’re dead) it’s easy to understand why the living can get so terrified by a paranormal encounter.

It makes total sense to me. Put yourself in their position. One day you’re walking down the street and all is well, then unfortunately something tragically out of the blue happens and you’re no longer part of the living. You’re now on the other side. You’re terrified, freaking out and you have no one to turn to. You try so hard to communicate with the living, but nothing – nadda. You try and try until one day your persistence finally becomes successful when you’re able to communicate with someone. But by this time, when you’re able to speak to a clairvoyant or whomever, you’ve got all this rush of excitement and that’s what scares the living because it becomes too overwhelming for them to handle.

Now this isn’t me in any way, shape or form, discarding all malevolent entities as non-malevolent. Extreme caution should always be utilized when investigating the paranormal because there are evil creatures/beings on the other side. So, be careful!

But the film did make me think and I wanted to share……

 

Get a copy of my novel, The Spirit Within on Amazon!

~ Sheila Renee Parker on Twitter: @sheilarparker.

~ Sheila Renee Parker on Facebook: Sheila Renee Parker – Author

 

ghosts

 

Masking the Dead

Not necessarily the type of accessory I’d want to wear with a Halloween or Masquerade Ball costume. However macabre this kind of mask may seem, it’s still rather fascinating to learn about.

According to Wikipedia, “A death mask is an image, typically in wax or plaster cast made of a person’s face following death, often by taking a cast or impression directly from the corpse. It is a primitive, yet most accurate, form of photography without a camera. Death masks may be momentos of the dead, or be used for creation of portraits….. The main purpose of the death mask from the Middle Ages until the 19th century was to serve as a model for sculptures in creating statues and busts of the deceased person.”

Even back during the ancient Egyptian times, masks were specifically created to put on the faces of the dead. To the living, it was considered to be very fashionable.

Famous death masks throughout history include:

Napoleon Bonaparte: French Military leader who died May 5, 1821 from a stomach ulcer.

Ludwig van Beethoven: German composer who died March 26, 1827 due to a post-hepatitic cirrhosis of the liver.

Aaron Burr: 3rd U. S. Vice President who served during Thomas Jefferson’s first term. Burr died September 14, 1836 from a stroke.

Abraham Lincoln: 16th President of the United States. Died April 15, 1865. Assassinated by American actor, John Wilkes Booth.

John Dillinger: American gangster who died July 22, 1934. Killed by gunfire during a shootout with federal agents.

Nikola Tesla: Serbian – American engineer, inventor and physicist. Died January 7, 1943 from a coronary thrombosis.

James Dean: American actor who died September 30, 1955 in a car accident.

Here are a few death masks of some pretty twisted individuals who were criminals that died by execution.

Johann Hatschwanz: Executed for murdering his wife by arsenic poisoning.

Johanne Rehn: Decapitated for murdering her daughter.

Carl Gottlob Irmscher. Decapitated for murdering his wife and child.

And I wouldn’t dare leave out the death mask of a very enchanting young woman who’s identity will forever remain unknown, but has intrigued so many with her peaceful beauty. The ever so elegant, L’Inconnue de la Seine, who died more than a century ago, but is now recognized as the serene face of CPR (Cardiopulmonary resuscitation), Resusci Anne.

L’Inconnue de la Seine, who died more than a century ago, but is now recognized as the serene face of CPR (Cardiopulmonary resuscitation), Resusci Anne.

Looking at these faces, there’s a macabre sense of immortality. The eternal slumbering expressions that these death masks possess make it seem as if the individuals will wake up at any given moment. They will forever be timeless in their own curious way.

Get a copy of my novel, The Spirit Within on Amazon!

~ Sheila Renee Parker on Twitter: @sheilarparker.

~ Sheila Renee Parker on Facebook: Sheila Renee Parker – Author

~ Sheila Renee Parker on Instagram: @sheilareneeparker

~ Art by Sheila Renee Parker available at: https://fineartamerica.com/profiles/sheilarenee-parker.html

Village Point in Daphne, Alabama

A tree to see with amazing history along with an old burial site known as D’Olive Cemetery….

 

Yesterday, Clay and I went to a really cool place located not far from where we live. It’s a historical site called Village Point in Daphne, Alabama. Here we got to see one of Alabama’s largest and oldest oak trees known as Jackson’s Oak. It is called the Jackson Oak after Andrew Jackson. He made a speech from one of its branches to his men before they marched onto Pensacola during the War of 1812. Also, troops were landed near here by Admiral Farragut during the Civil War to capture Blakely and Spanish Fort. This tree was also included as a map reference for the original Spanish land grant in 1792.

Another interesting fact about Village Point is that there is an old cemetery dating back to the early 1800s, the D’Olive Cemetery. Some of the headstones have French writing on them.

Village Point isn’t only a location that’s rich in history, it’s also full of beautiful nature trails and wildlife. Such an awesome place to check out!!

 

 

Jackson’s Oak is a beautiful and magnificent tree. Standing in front of it just demonstrates its magnitude.

 

 

 

 

 

 

D’Olive Cemetery Site

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mobile Bay

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Spooky Random Fact: #16”

“Spooky Random Fact: #16”

Do you have a fear of ghosts, anything ghoulish that goes bump in the night and causes fright?

Well, if you do, then don’t worry because millions of others do, too. It’s a very common fear known as “phasmophobia”. The word “phasmos” derives from the Greek language referring to “phantom” or “supernatural being”. It’s also known as “spectrophobia”. “Spectrum” is Latin referring to a specter, or an image of a thing, or an apparition.

Symptoms of phasmobia can typically be found in most disorders that lead to anxiety. A sufferer can go through feelings of dread, rapid heartbeat, panic attacks, also nausea and severe vomiting. It’s even been reported that a person suffering from phasmosphobia can develop OCD (obsessive compulsive disorder) in order to conduct rituals to negate any kind of ghostly presence.

Is there treatment for such a phobia? Read more at Phasmophobia: A Ghostly Fear

 

 

 

 

Get a copy of my novel, The Spirit Within on Amazon!

~ Sheila Renee Parker on Twitter: @sheilarparker.

~ Sheila Renee Parker on Facebook: Sheila Renee Parker – Author

~ Sheila Renee Parker on Instagram: @sheilareneeparker

~ Art by Sheila Renee Parker available at: https://fineartamerica.com/profiles/sheilarenee-parker.html